New Target – $250 for Antenna and Modem

This is a really easy target to hit, so please join in and help us get it!

mANT30 will significantly increase bandwidth.

We’ve already got a laptop and a decent camera for the Center in Badilisha. Their connection is still not good enough to do reliable communications, such as video calls and even uploading videos to post on this site. We need to get a good antenna kit, a directional one to point at the main tower on the Island.

Microtik mANT30 antenna
Microtik Sleeve30 Kit

This antenna, along with the sleeve kit, will provide a much better internet connection allowing our friends in Rusinga to keep us informed of the progress of their amazing projects. Collect some Satoshi now (sign up using the form on the right), or just check out the things you can do without signing up.

Bitcoin Goldrush in South Africa?


During an eye-opening journey, Ran NeuNer (blockchain investor and host of “Crypto Trader” on CNBC Africa) takes Lee on a tour of one of the nation’s poorest townships, Khayelitsha, South Africa, where he explains why it could be the true epicentre for the cryptocurrency revolution — not to mention the next potential gold mine for institutional and amateur investors alike. But it’s an unusual encounter with an Uber driver that paints the most vivid use case for digital currency’s future.

Watch clips of CNBC documentary “Bitcoin: Boom or Bust” online.

Almost there!

We wanted to make it possible for people to send currency directly to individuals who are doing worthwhile community projects in the Third World. It turned out not to be as easy as we thought, but now the work is almost done.

The First Free Bitcoin Faucet

Gavin Andreson’s faucet was paying 5BTC per day in 2010!

Imagine a faucet giving away 5BTC! That’s what Gavin Andreson’s faucet was paying back in June of 2010. It was his first bitcoin-related coding project and he started it off with ฿1,100. At today’s prices, that’s close to $100,000. Your claim of ฿5 would be worth $4,290!

Security Note: Site Gravatars Disabled

We’ve disabled  gravatars (the little avatar icons that show in your profile) because they pose a security threat. Many sites use an avatar service from gravatar.com:

An “avatar” is an image that represents you online—a little picture that appears next to your name when you interact with websites.

A Gravatar is a Globally Recognized Avatar. You upload it and create your profile just once, and then when you participate in any Gravatar-enabled site, your Gravatar image will automatically follow you there.

Apparently the sites using this service load the images using a hash of your address, and this hash can be used to reveal your email address. We believe the small convenience of having a picture follow you around on the web is outweighed by the security risks.

More in this Wordfence.com article.